Cardiologists on Vacation, and Concussion Victims Walk it Off

Cutting Edge Secret to Prevent Stroke and Heart Disease Naturally!

heart-disease

Click here to learn the cutting edge secret your doctor will never want you to know!

1 2 3
What Is The Chinese
Secret To Optimum
Blood Pressure?
Why This Is The
Healthiest Oil On Earth?
Click To Learn More
Bring Your Old
Battery Back To Life!
4 5 6
How To Survive In
Bed & Nail Women
Like A Rockstar!
100% of Your
Vital Nutrition In
Just 30 Seconds
How A 2000-Year-Old
Nepalese Secret To Cure
Your Sciatica in 7
DAYS OR LESS

You can directly support Healthcare Triage on Patreon: If you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content.
Healthcare Triage has merchandise:

This week's Healthcare Triage News is likely to upset some docs. Get your popcorn ready!

For those of you who want to read more, go here:

John Green — Executive Producer
Stan Muller — Director, Producer
Aaron Carroll — Writer
Mark Olsen — Graphics

Cardiologists on Vacation, and Concussion Victims Walk it Off

You can directly support Healthcare Triage on Patreon: http://vid.io/xqXr If you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content.
Healthcare Triage has merchandise: http://dft.ba/-HCTmerch

This week's Healthcare Triage News is likely to upset some docs. Get your popcorn ready!

For those of you who want to read more, go here: http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/?p=60498

John Green -- Executive Producer
Stan Muller -- Director, Producer
Aaron Carroll -- Writer
Mark Olsen -- Graphics

http://www.twitter.com/aaronecarroll
http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan
http://www.twitter.com/johngreen
http://www.twitter.com/olsenvideo

36 thoughts on “Cardiologists on Vacation, and Concussion Victims Walk it Off

    1. propably nocebo, if they expect to be in bed for 5 days they feel symptoms
      to reinforce that. That’s just a guess though

    2. Also if you are sitting around board not doing anything you have more time
      to think about and dwell on how you are feeling.

    3. +Tim Jadeglans That’s what I was wondering – could the symptoms be worse
      because they expect that a longer treatment would be prescribed for those
      with worse symptoms to begin with? Although I suppose if they know that
      their rest period has been randomly assigned, then that would have less of
      an effect.

    4. it could be possible that things like walking around, which causes your
      heart rate to go up slightly, helps pump more blood into your brain. you
      don’t get that when you’ve spent 5 days in a row, in bed.

  1. I suppose one concern in concussion treatment is preventing secondary
    incidents which are apparently very dangerous. However, you’d think as long
    as they’re not out playing rugby or hitting themselves in the head that it
    wouldn’t be too much of a risk.

  2. Off topic. Apparently no one has noticed that the outro has John’s twitter
    listed as @realjohngreen. He’s been @johngreen for a few months now :P

    1. +RogerWilco it was just a joke. i’m well aware of the fact, that your
      prefrontal cortex still has to undergo partial myelinisation and network
      restructuring but it is unclear if and what kind of behavioral implications
      this has. when it comes to something like a concussion it’s highly probable
      that this doesn’t factor into the aftermath at all and 22 year olds would
      virtually react the same as adults who are a few years older.

  3. We know that the mind has a powerful effect on the body, especially
    concerning recovery and sickness. Maybe we should be popping less pills in
    hospitals and doing more magic tricks. As weird as that sounds…

    1. But what about when the mind sees popping a pill as a magic trick? If I
      have a headache and swallow a painkiller of some kind, I immediately feel
      better as the pill is still half way own my throat. Clearly a placebo
      effect, but is it a bad thing?

    2. yes because your body can become resistant to that painkiller. They say
      half the treatment is the pill and half is your mind. After the 50th pill
      or so, it’s not going to work as well as before, and then your mind will
      think it’s no longer effective, thereby removing the placebo affect as
      well. Same with antibiotics.

      I support giving some people just straight sugar pills to give them a
      placebo effect. that way there isn’t any resistance formed.

  4. With the concussion recovery bit: how do we know this isn’t a nocebo
    effect? If a person is told they need 5 days to recover, isn’t it possible
    they expect they need 5 days before the symptoms go away and will report
    likewise?
    Follow up question: do we care if it’s a nocebo effect or not?

    1. There’s probably also the question of whether the 5 day group just noticed
      the symptoms more because they were laying around and didn’t have any
      activities to distract them from the symptoms. Kind of like the nocebo
      effect, sometimes having something else to think about distracts you from
      any discomforts.

  5. Are there any similar concussion studies that indicate that more severe
    concussions merit longer recovery periods?

  6. Thank you for your videos. I’m a researcher, but I’m not in the medical
    field what-so-ever. However, your videos make me more interested in the
    medical field.

  7. Maybe walking after a concussion helps because it improves circulation,
    more blood flow, maybe just maybe more red blood cells to repair the
    traumatized tissue is the answer.

  8. Last year while I was 14 I fell and hit my head so hard that a part of my
    hair got torn off, and my teacher said I was fine to continue on a 2 day
    hike we were travelling to. The next day I experienced nausea and sweating
    etc, and I was wondering if there is a possibility of long term damage from
    physically exerting myself the hardest I probably have in my life after
    hitting my head.

  9. Did anyone else notice that the concussion study only mentioned short term
    effects? Shouldn’t we be more concerned with the long term effects of a
    concussion? 

  10. Another possibility on the cardiac outcomes research is that while
    cardiologists are away more patients are being cared for by emergency
    medicine and internal medicine docs who may be treating more co-morbidities
    instead of concentrating only on the cardiac issues and leaving other
    issues to other physicians. If so, this could be one reason for better
    outcomes. A more specific example might be heart patients with diabetes,
    are cardiologists likely to concentrate on their traditional area and not
    work to get high blood sugars down or diabetes under control as internal
    medicine physicians, and might it make a significant difference in
    outcomes.

  11. Why are some people doing things that seem to make things worse? People
    like to do things about stuff. We’re tinkerers. Silly humans. ;p 

  12. Nocebo effect; “any amount of work [or recovery?] will expand to fill the
    allotted time and then for a week more”?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *