Cholesterol and Heart Disease

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My researched essay ''The High Cholesterol Paradox' seems to have gone some way to resolving all the confusion. Free .pdf essay download on this link

Cholesterol and Heart Disease

My researched essay ''The High Cholesterol Paradox' seems to have gone some way to resolving all the confusion. Free .pdf essay download on this link http://bit.ly/1fkGYgb

25 thoughts on “Cholesterol and Heart Disease

  1. Don’t you think the pharma companies could influence the food pyramid to
    contain recommended daily portions of meat/dairy/oil so that people will
    need their drugs?

  2. One has to wonder where Kendrick got his data about the Aboriginals. Such a
    low cholesterol level seems ancestral, and not consistent with their modern
    high fat, low fiber diet. BTW, Kendrick got his data on the European
    countries from the WHO MONICA Study. MONICA found that 10 year variations
    in cholesterol accounted for 35% of the risk for coronary events. Why
    doesn’t Kendrick tell us this? Lithuania and Russia jump out as having more
    heart disease than the others. Alcoholism anyone?

  3. I believe fat in the blood increases the viscosity of the blood,
    subsequently it causes high blood pressure. Fat in the blood is related to
    liver function. “Healthy diet” helps relieve the load on the liver. Just
    try to explain my personnel experience and not sure if it is accepted by
    the medical society.

  4. Makes perfect sense. If LDL is used to carry the fat to the brain, and the
    brain gray matter is mostly fat, then blocking it seems like a really bad
    idea to me.

  5. I agree that Cholesterol is not the culprit when it comes to heart disease.
    One thing though: if CHD mortality is the outcome measure on the graph used
    in this video, wont that be skewed by countries that have very effective
    medical systems (eg extensive ppci for the whole population). Shouldnt we
    be looking at incidence of coronary stenosis rather than death rates?

  6. And also, are we looking at diets today and mortality today? Surely
    mortality today is the product of a lifetime of dietry consumtion ?

  7. Typical cholesterol denier. Comparing aboriginals and the Swiss is
    dishonest. The Swiss have a high standard of living and an excellent health
    care system. The aborigines? Well, what do you think? 

    1. We now know that what is really important is the lipid nutrition cycle and
      the ratio of glycated-LDL to healthy LDL. Cholesterol per se is innocent.
      LDL is doing a job and glycation prevents receptor mediated uptake, leading
      to a build-up of unusable glycated-LDL and a drop in HDL on the return
      cycle to the liver. See papers: http://bit.ly/1fkGYgb
      Just waiting for clinical practice to catch up!!!

    2. You have to admire the faith in the marketing myth that cholesterol might
      do harm. Used widely to market statins, this has to be the next big
      corporate scandal – especially now that the BMA members are voicing their
      concerns.

  8. To Glyn I thought the brain matter was made up of 75% myelin which is 100%
    cholesterol. Much more than 2%. my father is taking 10mg of lipitor and
    thinks this low dosage is harmless. It would seem to me if statin drugs
    block the mevalonate pathway then any dose would block it. 

  9. Is the medical treatment Aborigenes can get in any way close to the
    treatment people can get in say Switzerland? I really do not know, so I
    have to ask. Death rates might just be higher because they do not get
    treated for even simple things.
    Another problem I have with the statistic are the general conditions, e.g.
    the big difference in climate compared to every other country in the list
    or the possibly very huge difference in population size (how many people
    are actually counted as “Aborigenian”? or however you spell it). If
    Aborigenes are only a small group of people, the possibility of statistic
    outsiders is pretty high, not considering specific life styles apart from
    fat intake which might influence heart disease (death) rate.
    To conclude this, there is a wide variety of things influencing your
    health, nobody is saying its fat and fat alone contributing to the risk of
    heart disease(s). And I’m also sure there is a lot of wrong information out
    there, because it’s about nutrition, but this graphic and this particular
    essay (which basically only says that sugar is worse than fat for you,
    which I agree with) do not convince me that a big amount of fat and having
    high cholesterol is good or at least not bad for you…

    1. Even when you exclude the bush people the finding is clear: None or a
      negative association between high cholesterol and death in heart disease.
      Even statin studies have shown increased death rates taking the pills, so
      the published material instead usually focus on other variables like number
      of heart attacks, numbers that are less reliable when studies are not
      double blind as even such diagnoses are subjective. Googling Seneff to see
      what Stephanie Seneff says can be an eyeopener.

  10. Check out “True Culprit of Heart Disease Finally Apprehended?”
    HERV-K102 foamy virus particle production in immunosuppressed hosts!

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