Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist in Scottsdale, Arizona

Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona

Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona

Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona

Cutting Edge Secret to Prevent Stroke and Heart Disease Naturally!

Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona

heart-disease - Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona

Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona

Click here to learn the cutting edge secret your doctor will never want you to know!

Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona

Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona

1 - Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona 2 - Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona 3 - Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona
What Is The Chinese
Secret To Optimum
Blood Pressure?
Why This Is The
Healthiest Oil On Earth?
Click To Learn More
Bring Your Old
Battery Back To Life!
4 - Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona 5 - Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona 6 - Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist In Scottsdale, Arizona
How To Survive In
Bed & Nail Women
Like A Rockstar!
100% of Your
Vital Nutrition In
Just 30 Seconds
How A 2000-Year-Old
Nepalese Secret To Cure
Your Sciatica in 7
DAYS OR LESS

Dr. Feyrer-Melk, cardiologist in Scottsdale, Arizona, talks with Wellnet TV about preventive cardiology and how important it is for cardiologists to utilize new technologies in risk assessment.

In preventive cardiology, cardiologists are looking to identify silent and invisible disease. In order to do that, Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk says different modalities need to be employed above and beyond the standard of care.

A Scottsdale, Arizona cardiologist, Dr. Feyrer-Melk says there are three basic tests cardiologists use in determining a patient s risk for cardiovascular disease. A cholesterol test is one of the first tests cardiologists give their patients, however, she says, over half of the patients who have heart attacks have normal cholesterol levels.

A stress test is another test to determine if a patient has a critical blockage around an artery around the heart. Critical blockage is defined as a greater than 70% blockage but almost 90% of heart attacks don t happen in those blockages, according to Dr. Feyrer-Melk. She says that they happen in the intermediate lesions, which are between 40-60%. Those blockages aren t picked up in a stress test, giving patients a false sense of security.

A third test a cardiologist would typically order is a fasting blood sugar test. The American Diabetes Association defines diabetes as having fasting blood sugars of greater than 125 on two occasions, says Dr. Feyrer-Melk, adding that they also define pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant diabetes as having a resting blood sugar above 100. Dr. Feyrer-Melk notes that when the blood sugars are above 100, about half the pancreas is not functioning properly.

Classic cardiologists are trained to do these risk assessments on patients and determe if they fall into a low, moderate or high risk category. Dr. Feyrer-Melk believes the problem with this is that in order to practice true prevention and look for silent disease, we need to go above those risk assessments by looking for disease through different modalities. This happens because we are experts diagnosing end-stage disease and not experts in diagnosing someone who has mild to moderate disease, and it is never normal to have disease in your arteries, Dr. Feyrer-Melk says.

Dr. Feyrer-Melk believes that we need to use standards of care as a basic skeleton to approach patients but we need to offer optimal care and endorse new technology and research and apply it to patients for ultimate prevention. We need to look at cardiovascular disease in a new light and need to evaluate patients with a new microscope, she notes.

There are new forms of testing that simply aren t on the radar, Dr. Feyrer-Melk says, such as salivary tests to assess risk, urine tests for inflammation, biosomes of teeth to look for bacteria, blood tests and genetic tests. For example, the carotid duplex scan looks at the thickness of the carotid artery before plaque appears. The American Heart Association calls this test an independent predictor of heart attacks and stroke and Dr. Feyrer-Melk believes this is a very important test.

Dr. Feyrer-Melk is a Scottsdale, Arizona-based cardiologist with Heart of Arizona. For more information on her practice, go to . She spoke with Wellnet TV, www.wellnettv.com, during this broadcast, providing online, on-demand wellness prevention video broadcasts.

Preventive Cardiology, With Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk, Cardiologist in Scottsdale, Arizona

Dr. Feyrer-Melk, cardiologist in Scottsdale, Arizona, talks with Wellnet TV about preventive cardiology and how important it is for cardiologists to utilize new technologies in risk assessment.

In preventive cardiology, cardiologists are looking to identify silent and invisible disease. In order to do that, Dr. Anne-Marie Feyrer-Melk says different modalities need to be employed above and beyond the standard of care.

A Scottsdale, Arizona cardiologist, Dr. Feyrer-Melk says there are three basic tests cardiologists use in determining a patient s risk for cardiovascular disease. A cholesterol test is one of the first tests cardiologists give their patients, however, she says, over half of the patients who have heart attacks have normal cholesterol levels.

A stress test is another test to determine if a patient has a critical blockage around an artery around the heart. Critical blockage is defined as a greater than 70% blockage but almost 90% of heart attacks don t happen in those blockages, according to Dr. Feyrer-Melk. She says that they happen in the intermediate lesions, which are between 40-60%. Those blockages aren t picked up in a stress test, giving patients a false sense of security.

A third test a cardiologist would typically order is a fasting blood sugar test. The American Diabetes Association defines diabetes as having fasting blood sugars of greater than 125 on two occasions, says Dr. Feyrer-Melk, adding that they also define pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant diabetes as having a resting blood sugar above 100. Dr. Feyrer-Melk notes that when the blood sugars are above 100, about half the pancreas is not functioning properly.

Classic cardiologists are trained to do these risk assessments on patients and determe if they fall into a low, moderate or high risk category. Dr. Feyrer-Melk believes the problem with this is that in order to practice true prevention and look for silent disease, we need to go above those risk assessments by looking for disease through different modalities. This happens because we are experts diagnosing end-stage disease and not experts in diagnosing someone who has mild to moderate disease, and it is never normal to have disease in your arteries, Dr. Feyrer-Melk says.

Dr. Feyrer-Melk believes that we need to use standards of care as a basic skeleton to approach patients but we need to offer optimal care and endorse new technology and research and apply it to patients for ultimate prevention. We need to look at cardiovascular disease in a new light and need to evaluate patients with a new microscope, she notes.

There are new forms of testing that simply aren t on the radar, Dr. Feyrer-Melk says, such as salivary tests to assess risk, urine tests for inflammation, biosomes of teeth to look for bacteria, blood tests and genetic tests. For example, the carotid duplex scan looks at the thickness of the carotid artery before plaque appears. The American Heart Association calls this test an independent predictor of heart attacks and stroke and Dr. Feyrer-Melk believes this is a very important test.

Dr. Feyrer-Melk is a Scottsdale, Arizona-based cardiologist with Heart of Arizona. For more information on her practice, go to http://www.heartofarizona.com/index.html. She spoke with Wellnet TV, www.wellnettv.com, during this broadcast, providing online, on-demand wellness prevention video broadcasts.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *