UF cardiologists, surgeons team up to offer life-extending procedure

UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure

UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure

UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure

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UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure

heart-disease - UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure

UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure

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UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure

UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure

1 - UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure 2 - UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure 3 - UF Cardiologists, Surgeons Team Up To Offer Life-extending Procedure
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — For patients who have severe narrowing of the aortic valve, a condition known as aortic stenosis, standard treatment is surgical replacement of the damaged valve. But advanced age or medical problems such as lung disease prevent many of those patients from having open chest surgery. In the past, the best such patients could hope for was to control their symptoms with medications.

Now they can live longer thanks to a new minimally invasive treatment that involves inserting an artificial valve that takes over the work of the diseased valve. The University of Florida is among a limited number of facilities around the country initially approved to offer the procedure.

"It's exciting — this technology opens an option for patients who otherwise do not have a repair option," said cardiologist Anthony A. Bavry, M.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor in the UF College of Medicine's department of medicine. "Previously we had to treat these patients with medications, and unfortunately many did not do well. This is a big change."

The new valve replacement technique, called transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in November 2011. Medical practices approved to perform the procedure had to demonstrate high levels of expertise and collaboration in cardiology and surgery, as well as high-quality facilities for conducting the procedure and collecting data for patient care and monitoring.

Bavry and R. David Anderson, M.D., M.S., director of interventional cardiology at UF, will team with thoracic and cardiovascular surgeons Thomas M. Beaver, M.D., M.P.H., and Charles T. Klodell, M.D., to do the procedure at UF&Shands, the University of Florida Academic Health Center. Working in such multidisciplinary teams streamlines and speeds patient evaluation and decisions about the best course of action.

UF cardiologists, surgeons team up to offer life-extending procedure

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — For patients who have severe narrowing of the aortic valve, a condition known as aortic stenosis, standard treatment is surgical replacement of the damaged valve. But advanced age or medical problems such as lung disease prevent many of those patients from having open chest surgery. In the past, the best such patients could hope for was to control their symptoms with medications.

Now they can live longer thanks to a new minimally invasive treatment that involves inserting an artificial valve that takes over the work of the diseased valve. The University of Florida is among a limited number of facilities around the country initially approved to offer the procedure.

"It's exciting — this technology opens an option for patients who otherwise do not have a repair option," said cardiologist Anthony A. Bavry, M.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor in the UF College of Medicine's department of medicine. "Previously we had to treat these patients with medications, and unfortunately many did not do well. This is a big change."

The new valve replacement technique, called transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in November 2011. Medical practices approved to perform the procedure had to demonstrate high levels of expertise and collaboration in cardiology and surgery, as well as high-quality facilities for conducting the procedure and collecting data for patient care and monitoring.

Bavry and R. David Anderson, M.D., M.S., director of interventional cardiology at UF, will team with thoracic and cardiovascular surgeons Thomas M. Beaver, M.D., M.P.H., and Charles T. Klodell, M.D., to do the procedure at UF&Shands, the University of Florida Academic Health Center. Working in such multidisciplinary teams streamlines and speeds patient evaluation and decisions about the best course of action.

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