Heart Surgery: Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

Fifteen percent of the population will need a new heart valve–either from age or congenital disease. Cardio Thoracic & Vascular Surgical Associates bring heart patients a new option in valve replacement. Current methods require a breaking of the breastplate; the CTVSA surgeon enters through the ribs to remove the damaged valve and suture in the new valve.The Mini-AVR is much less invasive than traditional open heart, the patient's recovery is much easier, there's less blood loss, shorter hospital stays (financial impact), smaller scar–without compromising quality, outcome or patient care.-This option helps patients leave the hospital in 2-3 days (vs. 1 week), and return to full activity in 1-2 weeks (vs. 12 with traditional open heart). Without compromising traditional surgical protocol, CTVSA's approach provides heart patients a low impact solution for valve replacement. This procedure was pioneered by Dr. Galloway at NYU. CTVSA specializes in minimally invasive approaches to heart surgery and Mini AVR is unique to CTVSA in the Midwest. This video presents the CTVSA/Dr. Galloway approach but was filmed under an Italian Doctor trained by Dr. Galloway. The procedure is the same.

British Heart Foundation – Your Guide to TOE (Transoesophageal Echocardiogram), heart disease test

Do you have a TOE test coming up? Watch this video to find out what to expect.

British Heart Foundation – Heart to Heart with Julia Davis & Jessica Hynes

Jessica Hynes and Julia Davis talk affairs of the heart with the British Heart Foundation for the Angina Monologues.

Your Guide to TAVI (Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) – heart disease treatment

Do you have a TAVI procedure coming up? Watch this video to find out what to expect.

British Heart Foundation – Here it is, your heart, 2009 TV ad

This is our latest TV campaign. Our campaign aims to increase understanding of the significance of heart disease.

We're asking everyone who has heart disease to get in touch by calling the Heart Helpline on 0300 333 1 333 so we can help you look after your heart.

British Heart Foundation – Living with Cardiomyopathy, Deborah Coleman

Deb Coleman suffered a cardiac arrest giving birth to her son, Cameron.

Deb didn't have any trouble with her heart beforehand but she has since been diagnosed as having dilated cardiomyopathy. In this film we learn about the impact this has had on her and her family.

British Heart Foundation – The science of the zebrafish

At the moment, there's no cure for a broken heart. Once your heart muscle is damaged by a heart attack, it can never fully recover. But there is hope.

We're funding Dr Tim Chico and his team at the MRC Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics. Here they explain the science behind our Appeal.

We need to spend £50 million to fund groundbreaking research that could begin to literally 'mend broken hearts' in as little as ten years time.

Your support can give hope to hundreds of thousands of people across the UK.

British Heart Foundation – Mending Broken Hearts, 2011 TV ad

At the moment, there's no cure for a broken heart.

Once your heart muscle is damaged by a heart attack, it can never fully recover. But there is hope.

We need to spend £50 million to fund groundbreaking research that could begin to literally 'mend broken hearts' in as little as ten years time.

Your support can give hope to hundreds of thousands of people across the UK.

British Heart Foundation – I hate heart disease, Emma’s story

Join the fight for every heartbeat. Donate today at

Emma Carter died 12 March 2004 from a cardiac arrest at just 13 years old. Her mother Jayne and brother Perry kindly agreed to help the British Heart Foundation fight heart disease. This is their story.